Comments on: Soloing Over Chord Progressions http://biznessreda.ru/?success=c minor relative chords&h1= Play better with free online guitar lessons. Sat, 19 May 2018 03:07:24 +0000 hourly 1 By: Patrick MacFarlane http://biznessreda.ru/?success=c minor relative chords&h1=#comment-4579 Tue, 03 Apr 2018 05:10:19 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=157#comment-4579 Thank you for the comment. It is hard to know without pointing to a specific embellishment. In general, embellishments are not limited to chord tones.

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By: jimmy jones http://biznessreda.ru/?success=c minor relative chords&h1=#comment-4425 Thu, 22 Mar 2018 17:22:29 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=157#comment-4425 Great lesson. Maria Elena by Los Indio Trabajaras has some beautiful embelishments between the phrasing of the melody. Would these be like chord tones of the mode that is being played?

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By: Patrick MacFarlane http://biznessreda.ru/?success=c minor relative chords&h1=#comment-2997 Wed, 28 Jun 2017 01:16:47 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=157#comment-2997 Thank you for providing your perspective. I’m sure it will be helpful to some readers! Sometimes you can play a couple different scales that differ by a note or two. If you “combine those scales” you can come up with a set of notes that works really well. Sometimes I like to switch between major and minor pentatonic scales and throw in the “blue” note from the blues scale. On occasion I add in a note from the Dorian or Mixolydian mode. I’ve been meaning to do a lesson on this because it has some practical benefits.

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By: Patrick MacFarlane http://biznessreda.ru/?success=c minor relative chords&h1=#comment-2996 Wed, 28 Jun 2017 01:11:38 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=157#comment-2996 I recommend that you read my lesson on the Modes. It is more time-consuming than learning one scale, but it gives you more options. The guitarists who use them learn how to sound different from the guy who only plays pentatonics.

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By: Neil http://biznessreda.ru/?success=c minor relative chords&h1=#comment-2905 Sun, 18 Jun 2017 15:04:59 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=157#comment-2905 That was a very helpful reply. Thanks. Now I get why modes are useful. Before, I couldn’t see the point of modes as they are all the same notes!

It makes be think that the most important thing is to know the notes numbers for each mode and scale all over the fretboard so using he 1 3 5 7 notes can be used to guide improvisation. That means, for example, any note in the C scale can be 1-7 depending on which mode is best for the current chord. Isn’t that a lot of learning even for just one scale, and how would that best be approached?

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By: Rick http://biznessreda.ru/?success=c minor relative chords&h1=#comment-2805 Sat, 03 Jun 2017 20:59:07 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=157#comment-2805 I’m fairly new to using modes in my solo work, and for about 20 years have been just “winging it” within a scale that I sort of made up… with decent results strangely enough, but also very limited, in tone and interest. For the record, I have been a “by ear” player all my life, and had limited theory.

I recently set out to expand my knowledge and began to learn about modes and other scales, and worked hard to memorize all 7 patterns, along with the 7 Pentatonics that are connected to these. Turns out, my made up scale is just pieces from 3 separately linked Pentatonic scales.

I found that memorizing all 7 mode patterns (and relative pentatonics), and knowing them forward backward, and practicing them going up one and down the other for interconnected scales, will help you with the concept that they are all just one great big scale called the Diotonic scale. Once you know this, you can find a combination of notes that sounds good, either over the key or each chord individually, and then apply the scale that best suits the pattern of notes you just played. This will fairly quickly lead you into a pattern that fits, and then you can alternate between Pentatonic and modal scales within the whole big picture to make things a bit interesting. It may take a few trials before you lock into the right mode, for example. Mixylodian and Dorion may share some similarities, or Mixolydian and Lydian. I’m still mastering this, but the more I practice, especially with a looping pedal, over random chord progressions, I am getting much more efficient at this.

Food for thaught for the non-technical guys out there.

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By: Patrick MacFarlane http://biznessreda.ru/?success=c minor relative chords&h1=#comment-2305 Tue, 21 Mar 2017 00:24:07 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=157#comment-2305 You’re welcome! Thank you for the kind words!

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By: David http://biznessreda.ru/?success=c minor relative chords&h1=#comment-2180 Thu, 02 Mar 2017 00:41:37 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=157#comment-2180 finally someone who is direct and clear
thank UUUUUU very much

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By: Patrick MacFarlane http://biznessreda.ru/?success=c minor relative chords&h1=#comment-2014 Wed, 08 Feb 2017 11:33:15 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=157#comment-2014 Thank you for your kind words. Good luck with your learning and your teaching!

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By: mark allen http://biznessreda.ru/?success=c minor relative chords&h1=#comment-1985 Sat, 04 Feb 2017 07:57:41 +0000 http://www.guitarlessonworld.com/2016/?p=157#comment-1985 Hi Patrick,
I am a drum teacher in schools, and am re-learning all my college music theory stuff again. Thank you so much for this explination. I work with a lot of Classically trained people, who don’t know about rock.blues,jazz etc. So consiquently I can’t really talk to them about ‘Music’. Now we can begin to communicate !!! thanks again, best of luck..

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